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Electric Motors

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For Suppliers

On this page, find out about the minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) that apply to some motor types, the regulatory requirements for electric motors and FAQs.

Overview

Electric motors are used in a wide range of applications, from large industrial equipment such as in mining operations, down to small household appliances like hair dryers.

The majority of electric motors draw less than 0.75 kW of power and are used in the residential and commercial sectors, for example inside refrigerators and computer hard drives. They account for only a small proportion of all electric motor power consumption.

The largest proportion of motor electricity consumption is attributable to mid-size motors with output power of 0.75 – 375 kW. These motors are predominantly used in industrial applications such as to power pumps, compressors and fans.

Is your product regulated?

Find out which GEMS determination or regulatory standard applies to your product

All products covered by energy efficiency regulations must meet certain requirements before they can be supplied or sold in Australia or New Zealand.

Depending on the product, this may include Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS), energy rating label requirements or both. There are specific requirements relevant to Australia and New Zealand.

At a glance...

 

MEPS

Energy Rating Label

Australia

New Zealand

Electric motors (three phase)

Yes

Other*

GEMS Determination

Requirements

* Whilst no Energy Rating Label is required, GEMS labelling requirements do apply. For more information see the relevant GEMS  determination.

Regulatory requirements for electric motors

Three phase electric motors are subject to Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) requirements in Australia and New Zealand.

What electric motors are covered?

Minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) ensure that a minimum level of energy efficiency is achieved for three phase cage induction motors with output power from 0.73 kW up to, but not including, 185 kW, with rated voltages up to 1100 V, alternating current (AC).

The Minimum Energy Performance Standards requirements are set out as minimum efficiency levels.

Efficiency Levels are set out in the tables below.

FAQ for Suppliers

In the MEPS standard for motors (AS/NZS 1359.5:2004) which of the efficiency tables are mandatory and which are optional?

In AS/NZS 1359.5:2004, the mandatory Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS 2) requirements are set out as minimum efficiency levels. These mandatory levels came into effect in Australia from 1 April 2006. These are set out in the tables at here as well as in AS/NZS 1359.5:2004. If Test Method A (AS/NZS 1359.102.3) is used, then Table A2 applies. If Test Method B (AS 1359.102.1) is used, then Table B2 applies. AS/NZS 1359.5:2004 also specifies voluntary high efficiency levels – Table A3 (for Test Method A) and Table B3 (for Test Method B).

How does the IEC 60034-30 efficiency classes standard relate to MEPS 2 levels for motors?

In regards to motors that are IE2 efficiency class (from IEC 60034-30), there are some differences between the IE2 levels in IEC 60034-30 and the Australian/NZ MEPS levels for some sizes of motors. In particular, IE2 levels are lower than our MEPS 2 levels for the smaller 2 and 4 pole motors. Also, IEC 60034-30 does not cover 8 pole motors. All motor suppliers must ensure that any motors registered and sold in Australia comply with the current Australian/NZ MEPS levels.

Can i register my motors based on the IEC 60034-2-1:2007 test method standard?

The IEC 60034-2-1:2007 test method standard currently lists 10 different test methods, including equivalent (but not identical) test methods to our Method A and Method B. Companies can choose a test method for registration, including IEC 60034-2-1, but they will need to specify whether it is Method A or Method B equivalent in their registration. However, it is the responsibility of companies to ensure that their motors will meet our MEPS 2 levels. All check testing undertaken by the E3 Program will be done to Method A or Method B (whichever has been specified in the registration).

Why are there two different test methods for the motor efficiency levels and what is the difference between them?

The AS/NZS standard 1359.5:2004 describes two internationally recognised test methods for motor efficiency levels. Both are valid for MEPS and are referred to as Test Method A and Test Method B. The main difference between the two test methods is in the way stray load losses are accounted for. The following is an extract from AS/NZS: 1359.5:2004: Method A: This method is identical to Method 1 of IEC 61972. It is also technically equivalent to the method specified in IEEE 112-B (USA). This method requires direct measurement of additional load losses and differs from Method B described below. Method B: This method is drawn from AS 1358:102.1, which is based on IEC 60034-2, including Amendment 1:1995 and Amendment 2:1996. In this method, an allowance of 0.5% fixed stray (additional load) loss is assumed for all the motors.

NOTE: The standards referred to in the current GEMS Determination are a ‘snapshot in time’; the information provided in the paragraph above is reflective of these standards at a given point in time. However, feedback provided by industry has highlighted the significant confusion this causes for applicants.  In order to reduce this confusion, the GEMS Regulator advises that applicants may now nominate Test Method A when registering electric motors tested under IEC 60034-2-1.

This is an interim arrangement while work on a replacement Determination is underway.  A consultation process for this replacement Determination will begin soon.

Does MEPS apply if the electric motor is part of new packaged equipment?

Clause 1.2 Exclusions in AS/NZS 1359.5-2004, item b) says that MEPS requirements of this Standard do not apply to ‘Motors that are integral with, and not separable from, a driven unit. Note: An example is a motor constructed on the same shaft as a compressor for an air-conditioning unit.’ Further clarification on this exclusion is available here.  If your motors are not covered by this exclusion, it is a mandatory requirement to use MEPS 2 compliant motors and register them before sale in Australia.

Does MEPS apply to single-phase motors?

In regards to mandatory Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS), there are no regulations currently in place for single phase motors. However, there may be other state or federal laws (for example, electrical safety laws) that may apply to single phase motors. You may wish to contact the electrical safety department in your state or territory for further information.

Which motors need to be registered for MEPS?

General information about MEPS 2 for three-phase electric motors is available here. All motors that fall under the scope of MEPS 2 must be registered before they can be legally sold in Australia. Information about the regulatory requirements and registration is available here. Further information is available in the Standard AS/NZS 1359.5-2004.

Efficiency Level Tables

The Minimum Energy Performance Standards requirements are set out as minimum efficiency levels. These are set out in the tables below for Test Method B (AS 1359.102.1) and Test Method A (AS/NZS 1359.102.3).

MEPS and “High Efficiency” levels are set out in the tables as follows:

Table A2: MEPS Test Method A

Table A3: “High Efficiency” Test Method A

Table B2: MEPS Test Method B

Table B3: “High Efficiency” Test Method B

A copy of the standard can be purchased from SAI Global (link is external) under licence from Standards Australia or Standards New Zealand.

Table A2: Efficiency Levels for Three Phase Electric Motors – Test Method A

Rated output kW

Minimum efficiency %

 

2 pole

4 pole

6 pole

8 pole

0.73

78.8

80.5

76.0

71.8

0.75

78.8

80.5

76.0

71.8

1.1

80.6

82.2

78.3

74.7

1.5

82.6

83.5

79.9

76.8

2.2

84.1

84.9

81.9

79.4

3

85.3

86.0

83.5

81.3

4

86.3

87.0

84.7

82.8

5.5

87.2

87.9

86.1

84.5

7.5

88.3

88.9

87.3

86.0

11

89.5

89.9

88.7

87.7

15

90.3

90.8

89.6

88.9

18.5

90.8

91.2

90.3

89.7

22

91.2

91.6

90.8

90.2

30

92.0

92.3

91.6

91.2

37

92.5

92.8

92.2

91.8

45

92.9

93.1

92.7

92.4

55

93.2

93.5

93.1

92.9

75

93.9

94.0

93.7

93.7

90

94.2

94.4

94.2

94.1

110

94.5

94.7

94.5

94.5

132

94.8

94.9

94.8

94.8

150

95.0

95.2

95.1

95.2

< 185

95.0

95.2

95.1

95.2

NOTES

For intermediate vales of rated output, the efficiency shall be determined by linear interpolation.

Tolerances specified in Table 1.1 of AS/NZS 1359.5 are applicable to the above values only in the case of a verification test.

Table A3: Efficiency Levels for Three Phase Electric Motors – Test Method A

Rated output kW

Minimum efficiency %

 

2 pole

4 pole

6 pole

8 pole

0.73

81.4

82.9

78.8

75.0

0.75

81.4

82.9

78.8

75.0

1.1

83.0

84.5

80.9

77.6

1.5

84.8

85.6

82.4

79.6

2.2

86.2

86.9

84.2

81.9

3

87.2

87.8

85.6

83.6

4

88.1

88.7

86.7

85.0

5.5

88.9

89.5

87.9

86.5

7.5

89.9

90.4

89.0

87.8

11

90.9

91.3

90.2

89.3

15

91.6

92.1

91.0

90.4

18.5

92.1

92.4

91.6

91.1

22

92.4

92.8

92.1

91.5

30

93.1

93.4

92.8

92.4

37

93.6

93.8

93.3

92.9

45

93.6

94.1

93.7

93.5

55

94.2

94.4

94.1

93.9

75

94.8

94.9

94.6

94.6

90

95.0

95.2

95.0

94.9

110

95.3

95.5

95.3

95.3

132

95.5

95.6

95.5

95.5

150

95.7

95.9

95.8

95.9

< 185

95.7

95.9

95.8

95.9

NOTES

For intermediate vales of rated output, the efficiency shall be determined by linear interpolation.

Tolerances specified in Table 1.1 of AS/NZS 1359.5 are applicable to the above values only in the case of a verification test.

Table B2: Efficiency Levels for Three Phase Electric Motors – Test Method B

Rated output kW

Minimum efficiency %

 

2 pole

4 pole

6 pole

8 pole

0.73

80.5

82.2

77.7

73.5

0.75

80.5

82.2

77.7

73.5

1.1

82.2

83.8

79.9

76.3

1.5

84.1

85.0

81.5

78.4

2.2

85.6

86.4

83.4

80.9

3

86.7

87.4

84.9

82.7

4

87.6

88.3

86.1

84.2

5.5

88.5

89.2

87.4

85.8

7.5

89.5

90.1

88.5

87.2

11

90.6

91.0

89.8

88.8

15

91.3

91.8

90.7

90.0

18.5

91.8

92.2

91.3

90.7

22

92.2

92.6

91.8

91.2

30

92.9

93.2

92.5

92.1

37

93.3

93.6

93.0

92.7

45

93.7

93.9

93.5

93.2

55

94.0

94.2

93.9

93.7

75

94.6

94.7

94.4

94.4

90

94.8

95.0

94.8

94.7

110

95.1

95.3

95.1

95.1

132

95.4

95.5

95.4

95.4

150

95.5

95.7

95.6

95.7

< 185

95.5

95.7

95.6

95.7

NOTES

For intermediate vales of rated output, the efficiency shall be determined by linear interpolation.

Tolerances specified in Table 1.1 of AS/NZS 1359.5 are applicable to the above values only in the case of a verification test.

Table B3: Efficiency Levels for Three Phase Electric Motors – Test Method B

Rated output kW

Minimum efficiency %

 

2 pole

4 pole

6 pole

8 pole

0.73

82.9

84.5

80.4

76.5

0.75

82.9

84.5

80.4

76.5

1.1

84.5

85.9

82.4

79.1

1.5

86.2

87.0

83.8

81.0

2.2

87.5

88.2

85.5

83.3

3

88.5

89.1

86.9

84.9

4

89.3

89.9

87.9

86.2

5.5

90.1

90.7

89.1

87.7

7.5

90.9

91.5

90.1

88.9

11

91.9

92.2

91.2

90.3

15

92.5

92.9

92.0

91.4

18.5

92.9

93.3

92.5

92.0

22

93.3

93.6

92.9

92.4

30

93.9

94.2

93.6

93.2

37

94.2

94.5

94.0

93.7

45

94.6

94.8

94.4

94.2

55

94.9

95.0

94.8

94.6

75

95.4

95.5

95.2

95.2

90

95.5

95.7

95.5

95.5

110

95.8

96.0

95.8

95.8

132

96.1

96.1

96.1

96.1

150

96.1

96.3

96.2

96.3

< 185

96.1

96.3

96.2

96.3

NOTES

For intermediate vales of rated output, the efficiency shall be determined by linear interpolation.

Tolerances specified in Table 1.1 of AS/NZS 1359.5 are applicable to the above values only in the case of a verification test.

Consultation

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